From My Library – Staff Blog

What Should I Read Next?
The Boy is Back by Meg Cabot

#3 in our new regular feature that offers up staff-selected recommendations for your consideration.

boyisbackThis week, I’d like to suggest a fun light-hearted novel, The Boy is Back, by Meg Cabot. Similar to Curtis Sittenfeld’s Eligible, this story is about children returning to help their aging parents and who along the way discover love. The story is told entirely through texts, emails, and journal entries and will keep you reading until the end.

Reed Stewart thought he’d left all his small town troubles—including a broken heart—behind when he ditched tiny Bloomville, Indiana, ten years ago to become rich and famous on the professional golf circuit. Then one tiny post on the Internet causes all of those troubles to return . . . with a vengeance. Becky Flowers has worked hard to build her successful senior relocation business, but she’s worked even harder to forget Reed Stewart ever existed. She has absolutely no intention of seeing him when he returns—until his family hires her to save his parents. Now Reed and Becky can’t avoid one another—or the memories of that one fateful night. And soon everything they thought they knew about themselves (and each other) has been turned upside down.

Mandy Richards, Adult Services Librarian

What Should I Read Next?
Commonwealth by Ann Patchett

Here’s the second entry in our new regular feature that will offer up some staff selected recommendations on books for you to consider.

I always look forward to a new book from Ann Patchett. Since reading Bel Canto and State of Wonder she has become a favorite author of mine. So needless to say that when I noticed a new book coming I put my name on the request list. And it didn’t disappoint: Commonwealth is a wonderful book.commonwealth

Commonwealth is the story of a kiss, a look in the eye, a parting of ways, and a life time of family. What happens to the family, over five decades, is the story and each character has a chance to explain their part. But whose story is it to tell? And, if you decide to tell the story, might you make others angry? These two families, divided or together, share a bond that is both fascinating and illuminating

Can I recommend this book? Yes, I can! And I am looking forward to the next book from Ann Patchett.

Nancy Kipping

What Should I Read Next?
Mischling : a novel by Affinity Konar

We’re going to try something new here, a regular feature that will offer up some staff selected recommendations on books for you to consider.

Let’s start with a book that is both compelling and hopeful, albeit a somewhat dark as it traversing one of the darkest moments in human history to show us the way toward ethereal beauty, moral reckoning. It is more than well worth the read. mischling

It’s Mischling : a novel by Affinity Konar.

It’s 1944 when the twin sisters arrive at Auschwitz with their mother and grandfather. In their benighted new world, Pearl and Stasha Zagorski take refuge in their identical natures, comforting themselves with the private language and shared games of their childhood. As part of the experimental population of twins known as Mengele’s Zoo, the girls experience privileges and horrors unknown to others, and they find themselves changed, stripped of the personalities they once shared, their identities altered by the burdens of guilt and pain. That winter, at a concert orchestrated by Mengele, Pearl disappears. Stasha grieves for her twin, but clings to the possibility that Pearl remains alive. When the camp is liberated by the Red Army, she and her companion Feliks–a boy bent on vengeance for his own lost twin–travel through Poland’s devastation. Undeterred by injury, starvation, or the chaos around them, motivated by equal parts danger and hope, they encounter hostile villagers, Jewish resistance fighters, and fellow refugees, their quest enabled by the notion that Mengele may be captured and brought to justice within the ruins of the Warsaw Zoo. As the young survivors discover what has become of the world, they must try to imagine a future within it.

booksthatchangedAnd for something a little lighter to browse, try The books that changed my life: reflections by 100 authors, actors, musicians, and other remarkable people – edited by Patrick Bethanne.

This is a quick, readable collection of reflections by prominent authors, politicians, actors, musicians, and celebrities on a book that changed their lives – maybe you’ll get some inspiration.

Dan Weiss

Check back often for more suggestions from the FML staff. Happy reading!